Monday, June 17, 2013

FLOORING INFORMATION

     Flooring Information

    Flooring is the general term for a permanent covering of a floor, or for the work of installing such a floor covering. Floor covering is a term to generically describe any finish material applied over a floor structure to provide a walking surface. Both terms are used interchangeably but floor covering refers more to loose-laid materials.
     Materials almost always classified as floor covering include carpet, area rugs, and resilient flooring such as linoleum or vinyl flooring. Materials commonly called flooring include wood flooring, ceramic tile, stone, terrazzo, and various seamless chemical floor coatings.

Flooring materials

 

The choice of material for floor covering is affected by factors such as cost, endurance, noise insulation, comfort and cleaning effort. Some types of flooring must not be installed below grade (lower than ground level), and laminate or hardwood should be avoided where there may be moisture or condensation.
The sub-floor may be finished in a way that makes it usable without any extra work, see:

Soft coverings

Carpet is a floor covering woven or felted from natural or man-made fibers. Fitted carpet is attached to the floor structure, extends wall-to-wall, and cannot be moved from place to place. An underlay will extend carpet life and improve comfort.
Rugs are also woven or felted from fibers, but are smaller than the room in which they are located, have a finished edge, and usually lie over another finished floor such as wood flooring. Rugs may either be temporarily attached to the flooring below by adhesive tape or other methods to prevent creep, or may be loose-laid.

Wood flooring

Many different species of wood are fabricated into wood flooring in two primary forms: plank and parquet. Hardwoods are typically much more durable than softwoods. Reclaimed lumber has a unique appearance and is used in green (environmentally responsible) building.
Laminate is a floor covering that appears similar to hardwood but is made with a plywood or medium density fiberboard ("MDF") core with a plastic laminate top layer. HDF laminate consists of high density fiberboard topped by one or more layers of decorative paper and a transparent protective layer. Laminate may be more durable than hardwood, but cannot be refinished like hardwood. Laminate flooring is available in many different patterns which can resemble different woods or even ceramic tile. It usually locks or taps together.
Bamboo flooring is a floor manufactured from the bamboo plant and is a type of hardwood flooring, though technically not a wood. Bamboo is known to be durable and environmentally friendly. It is available in many different patterns, colors, and textures.
Cork Flooring is a flooring material manufactured from the by-product of the cork oak tree. Cork floors are considered to be eco-friendly since the cork oak tree bark is stripped every nine to ten years and doesn't damage the tree. Cork flooring comes in both tiles and planks, and can have glue or glues-less installation.

Resilient flooring

Resilient flooring is made of material that has some elasticity. It includes many different manufactured products including linoleum, sheet vinyl, vinyl composition tile (VCT), cork (sheet or tile), rubber, and others. Performance surfaces used for dance or athletics are made of either wood or resilient flooring.

Hard flooring

Ceramic tiles flooring in Istanbul street
Ceramic tile includes a wide variety of clay products fired into thin units which are set in beds of mortar or mastic with the joints between tiles grouted. Varieties include quarry tile, porcelain tile, terracotta tile, and others.
Many different natural stones are cut into a variety of sizes, shapes, and thicknesses for use as flooring. Stone flooring is usually set in mortar and grouted similar to ceramic tile. Slate and marble are popular types of stone flooring.
New technologies are emerging since 2004 to produce hard floorings having the ability to light up when needed. These security glazing materials contain transparent LED embedded films laminated between glass.


Seamless chemical flooring

Many different seamless flooring materials are available. These are usually latex, polyester, urethane or epoxy compounds which are applied in liquid form to provide a completely seamless floor covering. These are usually found in wet areas such as laboratories or food processing plants. These may have granular or rubberized particles added to give better traction.

Sustainable flooring

 Sustainable flooring is produced from sustainable materials (and by a sustainable process) that reduces demands on ecosystems during its life-cycle. Some think that sustainable flooring creates safer and healthier buildings and guarantees a future for traditional producers of renewable resources that many communities depend onBrowse our materials guide to find the right carpeting and flooring for your home. Living rooms, bedrooms, kitchens, bathrooms, basements, and entryways all have unique flooring needs: wet spaces versus dry spaces, high-traffic versus low-traffic, subflooring differences, insulation needs. Our flooring guides and tips help to uncover those details that you might not have considered before. The differences between tile, carpet, hardwood, laminate, vinyl, linoleum, engineered flooring, and eco-friendly alternatives are vast, and our handy flooring guides help to ease some of the pressure of selecting a flooring material for your space that reflects your personal style and project budget. Cleaning, care, and upkeep also come into consideration when selecting the perfect flooring for you; learn about the pros and cons for each flooring type here. Discover the differences between ceramic, porcelain, and hard-bodied tile before you complete a do-it-yourself tile installation. Carpet tiles and area rugs are also good options for fickle tastes or for cushioning high-traffic areas; cleanable and replaceable, both options are easily switched out depending on taste, trends, and wear. 

 

Kitchen Flooring

 

 Flooring is an especially noticeable characteristic in the often-used space of a kitchen. Find the material that is right for your kitchen's style and for your budget by reading our buying guides and taking our flooring finder quiz. If you are a serious cook and spend a lot of time on your feet in the kitchen, one key consideration is to find materials for kitchen flooring with a cushioning effect such as wood, laminate, cork, and vinyl. Brick, ceramic tile, and stone are durable but hard to stand on for extended periods of time without a cushioned mat on top. Another tip about making the right kitchen flooring selection is to look for materials low in maintenance and high in durability. Think about the time you have for cleaning and maintaining your kitchen flooring. Know that high-maintenance flooring might look great, but it also requires pampering to stay that way. Finally, select kitchen flooring complementary to the cabinets, wall coverings, furniture, and other design elements in the room. Wood blends into any decorating scheme, and there are a variety of eco-friendly options such as bamboo and engineered wood that up your style quotient. Laminates and vinyl are ideal choices if you're after a patterned or colorful contemporary look. And stone and concrete add fun to a neutral or tone-on-tone color scheme

Flooring Tiles

 
A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, metal, or even glass. Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, walls, showers, or other objects such as tabletops. Alternatively, tile can sometimes refer to similar units made from lightweight materials such as perlite, wood, and mineral wool, typically used for wall and ceiling applications. In another sense, a tile is a construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of fired clay. Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made from porcelain, fired clay or ceramic with a hard glaze, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, metal, cork, and stone. Tiling stone is typically marble, onyx, granite or slate. Thinner tiles can be used on walls than on floors, which require thicker, more durable surfaces.

These are commonly made of ceramic or stone, although recent technological advances have resulted in rubber or glass tiles for floors as well. Ceramic tiles may be painted and glazed. Small mosaic tiles may be laid in various patterns. Floor tiles are typically set into mortar consisting of sand, cement and often a latex additive for extra adhesion. The spaces between the tiles are nowadays filled with sanded or unsanded floor grout, but traditionally mortar was used.
Natural stone tiles can be beautiful but as a natural product they are less uniform in color and pattern, and require more planning for use and installation. Mass-produced stone tiles are uniform in width and length. Granite or marble tiles are sawn on both sides and then polished or finished on the facing up side, so that they have a uniform thickness. Other natural stone tiles such as slate are typically "riven" (split) on the facing up side so that the thickness of the tile varies slightly from one spot on the tile to another and from one tile to another. Variations in tile thickness can be handled by adjusting the amount of mortar under each part of the tile, by using wide grout lines that "ramp" between different thicknesses, or by using a cold chisel to knock off high spots.
Some stone tiles such as polished granite, marble, and travertine are very slippery when wet. Stone tiles with a riven (split) surface such as slate or with a sawn and then sandblasted or honed surface will be more slip resistant. Ceramic tiles for use in wet areas can be made more slip resistant either by using very small tiles so that the grout lines acts as grooves or by imprinting a contour pattern onto the face of the tile.
The hardness of natural stone tiles varies such that some of the softer stone (e.g. limestone) tiles are not suitable for very heavy traffic floor areas. On the other hand, ceramic tiles typically have a glazed upper surface and when that becomes scratched or pitted the floor looks worn, whereas the same amount of wear on natural stone tiles will not show, or will be less noticeable.
Natural stone tiles can be stained by spilled liquids; they must be sealed and periodically resealed with a sealant in contrast to ceramic tiles which only need their grout lines sealed. However, because of the complex, non repeating patterns in natural stone, small amounts of dirt on many natural stone floor tiles do not show.
Most vendors of stone tiles emphasize that there will be variation in color and pattern from one batch of tiles to another of the same description and variation within the same batch. Stone floor tiles tend to be heavier than ceramic tiles and somewhat more prone to breakage during shipment.
Rubber floor tiles have a variety of uses, both in residential and commercial settings. They are especially useful in situations where it is desired to have high-traction floors or protection for an easily breakable floor. Some common uses include flooring of garage, workshops, patios, swimming pool decks, sport courts, gyms, and dance floors.
Plastic floor tiles including interlocking floor tiles that can be installed without adhesive or glue are a recent innovation and are suitable for areas subject to heavy traffic, wet areas and floors that are subject to movement, damp or contamination from oil, grease or other substances that may prevent adhesion to the substrate. Common uses include old factory floors, garages, gyms and sports complexes, schools and shops.

 

Roof Tiles 

Roof tiles are designed mainly to keep out rain, and are traditionally made from locally available materials such as clay or slate. Modern materials such as concrete and plastic are also used and some clay tiles have a waterproof glaze. A large number of shapes (or "profiles") of roof tiles have evolved. These include:

  • Flat tiles - the simplest type, which are laid in regular overlapping rows. An example of this is the clay-made "beaver-tail" tile (German Biberschwanz), common in Southern Germany. Flat roof tiles are usually made of clay but also may be made of stone, wood, plastic, concrete, or solar cells.
  • Imbrex and tegula, an ancient Roman pattern of curved and flat tiles that make rain channels on a roof.
  • Roman tiles - flat in the middle, with a concave curve at one end at a convex curve at the other, to allow interlocking.
  • Pantiles - with an S-shaped profile, allowing adjacent tiles to interlock. These result in a ridged pattern resembling a ploughed field. An example of this is the "double Roman" tile, dating from the late 19th century in England and USA.
  • Mission or barrel tiles are semi-cylindrical tiles laid in alternating columns of convex and concave tiles. Originally they were made by forming clay around a curved surface, often a log or the maker's thigh. Today barrel tiles are mass-produced from clay, metal, concrete or plastic.
  • Interlocking roof tiles are similar to pantile with side and top locking to improve protection from water and wind.
  • Antefixes: vertical blocks which terminate the covering tiles of a tiled roof.
Roof tiles are 'hung' from the framework of a roof by fixing them with nails. The tiles are usually hung in parallel rows, with each row overlapping the row below it to exclude rainwater and to cover the nails that hold the row below. There are also roof tiles for special positions, particularly where the planes of the several pitches meet. They include ridge, hip and valley tiles.These can either be bedded and pointed in cement mortar or mechanically fixed.
Similarly to roof tiling, tiling has been used to provide a protective weather envelope to the sides of timber frame buildings. These are hung on laths nailed to wall timbers, with tiles specially moulded to cover corners and jambs. Often these tiles are shaped at the exposed end to give a decorative effect. Another form of this is the so-called mathematical tile, which was hung on laths, nailed and then grouted. This form of tiling gives an imitation of brickwork and was developed to give the appearance of brick, but avoided the Brick Taxes of the 18th century.

 


 





17 comments:

  1. I want to build a room onto the back of my home. The base will obviously be made of plywood. How do I fasten the plywood securely. I cannot have my walls fall apart from the inside out.
    http://www.famitchell.com.au

    ReplyDelete
  2. I want to build a room onto the back of my home. The base will obviously be made of plywood. How do I fasten the plywood securely. I cannot have my walls fall apart from the inside out.
    http://www.famitchell.com.au

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very helpful recommendations you have shared. For more information visit: complete flooring solutions

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for sharing such a wonderful post. We are providing best quality of steel fiber at affordable prices. For more details visit our website or contact 7620078063.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Ultratech building design and construction solutions by ultratechcement offers home building solutions right from planning to completion.
    building design and construction

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ultratech building design and construction solutions by ultratechcement offers home building solutions right from planning to completion.
    building design and construction

    ReplyDelete
  7. Great ! Very nice blog...Many Helpful things exist in your blog content. Thank you for sharing your post with us...

    Kingston
    Wooden Flooring In Delhi NCR

    ReplyDelete
  8. Twin wall sheets are completely protected against fire and do not give off any kind of toxic gases.
    Polycarbonate Roofing Materials|Polycarbonate Roofing Sheets

    ReplyDelete
  9. This is my personal experience in following Comments and this review will be helpful after buying Boom Lift rental machine. I am using Boom Lift machine for my Company inner outer room work last two months and I bought Boom Lift machine from The Sendhamarai Engineering.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks for sharing the great information. It is well written!!
    Industrial Hardeners

    ReplyDelete
  11. U look sathiyam cinemas Pantry the Modular Kitchen In Chennai is more preferred for looking and sound effects

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thank you for sharing the information here. Its much informative and really i got some valid information. You had posted the amazing article. Chequered Tiles Moulds | hindustan chemicals

    ReplyDelete
  13. Great Post but I would like more information about this, because it is very nice., Thanks for sharing.
    construction materials exporters in india

    ReplyDelete
  14. polyurethane that dries in about eight hours. This type of finish ambers with age and comes in different sheen levels.
    Master Concrete Flooring

    ReplyDelete